.223 Remington From Combat to Popular Use

.223 Remington ammo

The .223 Remington cartridge came from a series of designs that were created after the Second World War. Germany had made famous their MP43 assault rifle. Military leaders demanded that their firearms designers follow suit. Designers were ordered to create ammunition that could mirror the success of the 7.92×33 Kurz cartridge. They required the ammo to be light enough to carry into combat and powerful enough to defeat its enemies. Munitions designers experimented with prototype assault rifles and scaled down cartridges. Members of the newly-formed NATO agreed to work together to create a universal rifle for the allied infantry.

Development of .223 Remington

The 1950s changed the firearms industry in many ways. The American military demanded lightweight rifles. In 1955, ArmaLite’s Chief Engineer, Eugene Stoner, presented his design for the ArmaLite AR-10. The AR-10 was the first lightweight infantry rifle, chambered to the 7.62x51mm NATO. The military rejected the AR-10 in favor of the M14, most likely because the former was too late to complete the appropriate tests.

The military revived the AR-10’s hopes in 1957. The United States Continental Army Command asked for a smaller version of the gun. They wanted the new rifle to use .22 caliber ammo. Stoner invented the AR-15 rifle.

In 1964, the U.S. Air Force adopted the AR-15 as the M-16 rifle. The rifle eventually became standard issue for the military.

In 1980, the .223 Remington round was changed again. It now uses a 62-grain full metal jacket bullet with a 7-grain steel core for improved penetration.

Current Specifications

The standard .223 cartridge uses a .224-inch diameter boat-tailed bullet in a rimless, bottle-necked case. The bullet measures 1.76 inches in length with the overall length of the round is 2.26 inches.

Standard factory loads range in weight from 35 to 85 grains. However, the most common is the 55-grain bullet. It uses a small rifle primer and has a max pressure of 55,000 PSI.

Popular Use

Remington introduced .223 ammo to the general public one month before it was adopted by the Air Force. It uses a lower pressure than the 5.56 NATO. As a result, it is good for target shooting, plinking and for first-timers or kids. Although it isn’t legal in all states, hunters often use the ammo to hunt deer or similar medium-size game. Perhaps the most common use is to control varmints – rats, rabbits, gophers, weasels and groundhogs, etc. The round can also stop larger pests such as skunks, coyotes, feral dogs and cats, raccoons, and opossums. The ammunition is relatively cheap, especially if it’s purchased in bulk. Secondly, it’s easy to get and can be used for a variety of things.

In addition to general use, .223 ammo is also a preferred round for law enforcement agencies. Police often use the ammo in their patrol cars, often as a replacement for a 12-gauge shotgun if they require more accuracy and precision.

With its wide range and popularity, the .223 Remington cartridge will continue to be one of America’s favorite rounds for years to come.

 

 

 

 

Top Picks for .308 Semi-Automatic Rifles

Hunters embrace semi-auto rifles

Winchester introduced its Winchester Model 70 bolt-action rifle in 1952. The rifle was accompanied by .308 ammunition. The cartridge was upgraded from the 7.62x51mm NATO, commonly used by the military.

The Ultimate Hunting Rifle

The Winchester .308 may be the most well-known rifle for hunting medium to large game. In fact, .308 ammo was made for hunting. The effectiveness of the gun and its ammo is the ability to deliver hydrostatic shock to its target, rendering the animal useless.

Hunters and competition shooters are loyal to their guns. Fans of the .308 swear by its ability to hit long-distance targets. Although the accuracy of a round deteriorates when shot father than 500 yards, the .308 is capable of making the trip.

Modern Uses

Hunting isn’t as popular as it used to be, but the .308 has found a modern audience. Law enforcement agencies and military units prize the .308 for accuracy and precision. It is useful in urban situations, able to hit a target at 1,000 yards. Unlike larger calibers, the Winchester .308 rifle is easy to shoot with less recoil than larger models.

There are several .308 semi-auto rifles on the market that offer advantages over the traditional rifle. In addition to being able to take down a prize elk or bear, the .308 semi-auto works well as a tactical training weapon. It will also do a good job of protecting the outside of your home from critters and intruders. It is not the best choice for in-home protection however, as the round is powerful and could easily cause personal injury or damage to the home. In that case, stick with your trusty shotgun or a pistol.

Top Picks

There are a lot of .308 semi-autos on the market but my pick for the top three is based on price and performance.

Century Arms C308

Serious enthusiasts love semi-automatics, even though they’re expensive. The exception is the Century Arms C308. For about $800 you can buy a rifle that is basically a copy of the HK G3. The gun uses a 5-round or 20-round detachable box magazine that won’t break the bank. Some say the C308 is slightly awkward to handle but that can be overcome with practice.

Ruger SR-762

The AR market has skyrocketed in recent years. The upside to the AR’s popularity is that parts and ammo are plentiful. The downside is that the guns aren’t cheap. You can expect to pay up to $2,000 for a Ruger SR-762.

Springfield M1A

The Springfield M1A is a civilian version of the rifle used by the military since the 1950s. Today’s M1A is more versatile as it comes in different sizes with a variety of options. The gun is known for being reliable and hearty, but it’s also heavy and long. The current price is just under $2,000.

Conclusion

Experienced gun owners know that it takes practice to adapt to any new weapon. My advice is to test out several models before choosing the one that suits you best. The only sure thing is that a .308 can last a lifetime.

 

 

The Iconic .22 LR

.22LR can be purchased in bulk

In 1857, Smith & Wesson introduced the .22 LR, which became the most popular rimfire cartridge in history. Enthusiasts use  it for target practice, training, plinking, sporting events, and varmint control. Shooters love the economical price and the fact that it is easy to buy in bulk. Shooters use the round in a variety of guns including handguns, shotguns, rifles, and submachine guns. Users appreciate the low recoil and small muzzle flash, which also makes it desirable for young and novice shooters.

.22LR ammo has four velocity ranges: subsonic, standard velocity, high velocity, and hyper velocity.

A Brief History

The .22 was designed for Smith & Wesson’s First Model. Designers modeled it after the 1845 Flobert BB cap. Weapons manufacturer J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. had combined a .22 Long casing with a 40-grain bullet used for the .22 Extra Long. Manufacturers have modified the bullet to accommodate additional grains of powder; currently, there are three types: .22 Short, .22 Long, and.22 Extra Long. The .22 Short is not often seen on the market although it can be purchased through online sources.

The .22 LR is interchangeable between guns which is a benefit for those using a variety of weapons. The round is not recommended for self-defense or large game hunting due to its lack of power.

Currently, the .22 LR is the only .22 rimfire cartridge seen on the market. The .22 Short is rare and in most circles has become scarce.

Self-Defense

Despite the fact that the .22 LR doesn’t have a great deal of stopping power, it is still a common choice for self-defense and concealed carry. The round can be chambered in small and lightweight pocket guns, easily carried in a purse or jacket.  Experts say that the cartridge will work well in most up-close situations, as long as the shooter has good aim. Shooters can fire the bullet fast and accurately so multiple shots are a possibility if they are needed. Since many people shoot to scare away their target, the .22 will work just fine.

Experts say that the brand of ammo is important when choosing a .22 LR. While many brands work well, you will find, on occasion, some that jam or misfire. Shooters should test different brands to find the one that works the best with their weapon of choice.

Popularity

Novice shooters use a .22 for target practice and training. The lack of power makes it safer for new users. The low recoil keeps the round from startling the shooter, thereby disrupting his posture and aim at the target. Countries restricting larger caliber bullets tend to permit the use of a .22 caliber.

It remains the bullet of choice for various organizations including the Boy Scouts of America and 4H Clubs. Military cadets use .22 LR cadet rifles for basic weapons and marksmanship training. The .22 LR is widely used in competition shooting, including the Olympic games, pistol and precision rifle competitions.

 

 

 

Powerhouse .50 AE

.50 AE Desert Eagle

The .50 Action Express was introduced in 1988. The cartridge was designed by Evan Whildin, former vice-president of Action Arms. Whildin designed the cartridge as part of a program to boost the performance of the semi-auto pistol by creating a new cartridge design. Whildin developed the Action Express line to travel faster and fire hotter than standard forms of ammo. When testing was complete, Whildin released the line to the public. It included the .50 AE, a 9 mm and .41 caliber rounds. Although the smaller calibers never gained popularity, the .50 Action Express caught the attention of the firearms community. The ammunition is still available from several major manufacturers including CCI, Speer, Hornady, and IMI (imported by Magnum Research).

The .50 AE was destined to be used in the IMI Desert Eagle, a semi-automatic pistol imported by Magnum Research, Inc. The gun was already chambered for the .44 Magnum, and would only need a barrel change to use the .50 cal. The .50 AE features the same rim diameter and overall length as the .44 Magnum.

Ballistics

The .50 Action Express ammo is one of the most powerful pistol cartridges on the market. It has a .500-inch bullet diameter enclosed in a 1.285-inch straight-walled case with a rebated rim. SAAMI says the maximum pressure of .50 AE should not exceed 36,000 PSI.

Users report a significant recoil and muzzle blast. Many compare the recoil to the .44 Magnum.

The .50 AE uses a 325- grain bullet and offers a muzzle velocity of 1400 FPS. The 300-grain bullet has a muzzle velocity of 1400 FPS and offers 1414 ft-lbs of energy.

Types of .50 AE Ammo

The .50 AE cartridge is available in several bullet types, including jacketed hollow point (JHP), Bonded Jacketed Hollow Point (BJHP), soft point (SP) and Jacketed Soft Point (JSP).

JHP ammunition uses a lead bullet encased in a hard metal, typically copper. The bullet contains a hollow point, which allows the bullet to expand upon impact. Users choose JHP ammunition for personal protection, home defense, and game hunting.

Soft Points do the job although they offer less stopping power. It gives shooters a slower expansion and deeper penetration. Manufacturers use a soft lead projectile. As a result, hunters will use soft point bullets  in areas where JHP cartridges are restricted.

Popularity

Whildin had a contract with the Israeli military. The Israeli Military Industries (IMI) Magnum Research Desert Eagle uses the ammunition, however, it was not the first gun to use the round. The first firearm chambered in the .50 AE caliber was the Arcadia Machine and Tool Automag V, a semi-auto, single action pistol. The weapons is described as the most “ergonomic and lightweight” of big caliber handguns.

Usage

Shooters choose the .50 AE when they want maximum power. Users prefer the round for silhouette shooting and medium to large game hunting, suitable against large predators such as bears. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (BATFE) categorizes the non-sporting round as a destructive device under its current regulations.

 

Law Enforcement Chooses .45 GAP Ammo

Florida Highway Patrol Chooses .45 GAP

Glock introduced .45 Glock Automatic Pistol (GAP) ammunition in 2003. It was the first cartridge manufactured by the Austrian firearms manufacturer. The ammo is a rimless, straight-walled round that shares the same bullet diameter of the .45 Automatic Colt Pistol (ACP). The diameter is .451 inch. The .45 GAP is housed in a .755-inch casing, the same length as a 9mm shell). The cartridge’s overall length is 1.070 inches.

The ammo is made with a big bore bullet and uses a small pistol primer. Its maximum pressure is 23,000 pounds psi. It is ideal for self-defense and concealed carry. The round is suitable for use by civilians, military and law enforcement. It is efficient, accurate, and reliable. Glock has supplied United States law enforcement with more handguns in the last twenty years than any other weapons manufacturer.

Development of the .45 GAP

Glock aimed to design a .45 cartridge for a compact handgun that didn’t have an oversized grip. The design would allow the weapon to be used for concealed carry. In 2003, Glock introduced the Glock 37. They collaborated with ammunition designer Ernest Durham, an engineer with CCI/Speer.

Glock told Speer what it needed in new ammunition. They wanted a .45 caliber bullet housed in a case no longer than the one used for a 9mm Parabellum or .40 S&W. They also requested a cartridge that could easily fit inside a grip similar to their Model 17 or 22 pistols. The size would ensure that the gun could be used by most shooters, regardless of the size of the user’s hand.

Speer delivered the cartridges. The finished product was created using bullets ranging from 165-grain to 230-grain. The .45 GAP ammo’s muzzle energy averages 400 to 500 foot-pounds (ft-lbs).

The Popularity of the .45 GAP

The public quickly embraced the .45 GAP. As a result, several firearms manufacturers made pistols to house the new ammo. The trend died down and eventually Glock and Bond Arms became the only companies to continue production.

Currently, Glock offers several pistols chambered in .45 GAP: Model 37 (full-size), 38 (compact), and 39 (sub-compact).

Some shooters falsely claim that the .45 ACP and .45 GAP are interchangeable. The extractor grooves are cut differently which makes the main difference. Additionally, the .45 GAP uses a small pistol primer whereas the .45 ACP uses a large pistol primer.

Law Enforcement

Glock’s biggest success with the .45 GAP has been with the law enforcement community. Several state law enforcement agencies use the Glock 37 with .45 GAP ammo as standard issue. The ammo has similar fire power and performance compared to the .45 ACP yet is more compact.

Many law enforcement agencies have switched from .45-caliber weapons in favor of guns chambered in 9x19mm and .40 S&W. Despite the trend, three state law enforcement agencies have chosen the .45 GAP as a replacement for their standard issue 9mm Parabellum (New York) or .40 S&W service weapons (Florida and South Carolina). Smaller law enforcement agencies have also chosen to use the Glock 37 and .45 GAP. They include the Burden, Kansas Police Department, Greenville, North Carolina Police Department, and the Berkeley, Missouri Police Department.

The Georgia State Patrol previously carried the Glock Model 37. It has replaced it with the fourth generation 9mm Glock 17. The South Carolina Highway Patrol also abandoned the Glock 37 in favor of the Glock 17 “M” also chambered in 9mm.

The Pennsylvania State Police used the Glock 37 from 2007-2013. Lack of ammunition caused the agency to adopt the fourth generation Glock 21 chambered in .45 ACP. The police experienced recall issues and switched to the SIG-Sauer P227 in .45 ACP.

Types of .45 GAP Ammo

Several ammunition manufacturers produce .45 GAP ammunition, but it’s not a popular round. Most shooters looking for bulk ammunition choose from full metal jacket (FMJ), total metal jacket (TMJ), or jacketed hollow point (JHP) rounds.

  • Full Metal Jacket (FMJ) ammo is a lead bullet enclosed in a metal, typically copper, casing. The casing helps the projectile maintain its shape from firing to impact at the target site. FMJ rounds are typically used for plinking and target shooting. They can also be used for self-defense purposes.
  • Total Metal Jacket (TMJ) ammo is like FMJ in that it uses a lead bullet sheathed in a harder metal. The lead bullet is exposed within the round’s casing, unlike the FMJ. TMJ bullets feature a projectile is encased in copper. The shooter’s exposure to lead is limited due to the cooper casing. Some indoor shooting ranges in the U.S. require this configuration.
  • Jacketed Hollow Point (JHP) ammo also uses a lead bullet encased in copper, but this bullet has a hollow point in its center. The hollow point allows for greater expansion upon impact. The expansion creates a larger entrance wound while reducing the risk of over-penetration.

 

 

 

The Iconic Colt Detective Special

Colt Detective

Manufactured by Colt’s Manufacturing Company in 1927, the Colt Detective Special is one of the most iconic snubnosed revolvers ever made. It’s a six-shot, double-action revolver with a 2” barrel historically used by plain clothes police detectives when carrying concealed. It also became a popular model to carry off-duty.

History

Colt employee John Henry Fitzgerald came up with the concept of the “Fitz Special” snubnosed revolver in the mid-1920s. Fitzgerald wanted to reduce the barrel size of the .38 Special Colt Police Positive Special revolver to make it easier for police to carry concealed. He shortened the barrel and ejector rod and removed the front of the trigger guard to enable faster trigger acquisition. Fitzgerald also modified the butt and bobbed the hammer spur to make it faster to draw without catching on the policeman’s clothing.

The Detective Special

The Fitz Special made such an impression on Colt that they made some modifications to the design and introduced the Detective Special. Upon its release in 1927, the Detective Special became an instant success. Several law enforcement agencies worldwide still use the gun.

Five Generations

There have been five generations of the Detective Special, starting with the first generation in 1927. Some purists only consider the gun to have had four issues, since the fifth issue was a last-ditch attempt at reviving the weapon by making a run using spare parts. 

First Issue

The Detective Special was first manufactured from 1927-1946. This issue was the pared down version of the .38 Special Colt Police Positive Special revolver. Distinctive features of the “snubby” included a shortened ejector rod with an ungrooved, knurled tip; a checkered cylinder latch and hammer spur, wooden grip panels, and a “half-moon” shaped front sight. The earliest model, featuring a 2” barrel, retained the original square butt grip frame. In 1933, Colt rounded off the grip frame to make the weapon easier to conceal. Colt switched over to the rounded butt for the Detective Special. However, the original square butt was used into the 1940’s.

Detective Specials were manufactured for the U.S. Government during World War II. Due to the high demand and quick turn-around required, many of the weapons had the original square butt. Historians believe that the guns were pre-war Police Positive Specials retrofitted with 2” barrels.

Second Issue

The second issue of the Detective Special was sold from 1947 to 1965. After World War II, Colt began to make changes to its line, including the Detective Special. The company changed a variety of things including the cylinder retention system. They also replaced the front sight, altered the hammer spur, and lengthened the ejector rod.

The gun’s grips were known as “Coltwood,” made from a reddish-brown plastic. This was common throughout the 1940’s and 1950’s. In later years, Colt returned to using checkered American Walnut embellished with silver Colt medallions.

The second issue offered a 3” variant with a lengthened ejector rod. Colt changed to a serrated trigger spur, and the cylinder latch was smoother than the original.

Third Issue

Produced from 1966 to 1972, the Detective Special’s third issue only offered a minor change. Colt changed the grip frame to match the short, “stubby” frame used on the Colt Agent. Colt changed the grips to simplify and reduce the cost of production. Other changes included adding a new shroud to enclose and protect the ejector rod. Designers changed the front sight to a full ramp, and oversized wooden gripstocks covered the front frame strap.

Variations on the third issue included a limited run of nickel-plated guns as well as a 3” barrel variant.

Fourth Issue

Produced from 1973-1986, the fourth issue was the last of the series and featured the last major design change made by Colt. In 1973, Colt changed the barrel to a heavier version, adding a shroud designed to cover ramped front sight and the ejector rod. They also changed the narrow, old-style grips to a sleeker combat-style that wrapped around the frame. Additionally, the formerly grooved trigger was now smooth.

In 1986, faced with dwindling sales and rising costs, Colt discontinued the Detective Special.

Fifth Issue

Manufactured from 1993-1995, the fifth issue was a last hurrah for the Detective Special. Colt had just recovered from bankruptcy. The company decided to take leftover parts and made a short production run of Detective Specials. The reissue was an instant success.  There was enough demand from the reintroduction that Colt continued to produce the gun until 1995.  The guns were identical to the 1973 model except for the introduction of Pachmayr’s “Compac” rubber grips.

The Detective Special’s revival only lasted until 1995, when Colt introduced the stainless-steel SF-VI.

Many experts tout Colt’s Detective Special as one of the finest snubnose revolvers ever made.

5 Commonly Misused Gun and Ammo Terms

It doesn’t matter if it’s a gun novice or an anti-gun lobbyist group, many people out there have a bad habit of saying misused gun and ammo terms. From political agendas to regional lexicon mistakes, it’s a wonder anyone knows what the other person’s talking about.

Here are some of the most common misused gun and ammo terms today

Clip

A clip is NOT what holds your cartridges and feeds them into your firearm. That’s a magazine. A clip is designed to help you quickly load your magazine. If you get confused, just remember that a clip has no moving parts (like a paper clip), while a magazine does (like the pages of a magazine).

Accidental Discharge

Almost every single time someone “accidently” shoots another person, the media and (some) politicians start talking about guns and how they accidentally discharge. And while there are such things as accidental discharges, that’s not what happened in these circumstances. See, an accidental discharge occurs when a gun misfires and they’re rare.  But negligent discharges, which occur when a person pulls the trigger when they shouldn’t have, happen all too often.

Assault Weapon

This vague term is not a firearm term, but rather a political one. It made its way into the modern vocabulary in 1989 and, it seems, is here to stay. But what is an assault weapon? No one really knows. Unknowing people often think its an automatic rifle, but then when the anti-gun establishment uses it, that’s not what they’re referring to, after all, civilians aren’t allowed to own automatic weapons. Others assume it means assault rifles, which isn’t the case. And still more assume that the AR in AR-15 refers to assault rifle, and it, therefore, must be an assault weapon, but that’s not true either. Instead, it represents ArmaLite rifle, the first company to make and market the AR-15.

Pistol

In many people’s mind, even those who use firearms, a pistol solely refers to a semi-automatic handgun, but the term has a much boarder definition. In face, a pistol is any gun that is designed to be held with one hand. That means both semi-automatics, such as the iconic Colt 1911, and revolvers, like the Ruger SP101, are pistols

Bullet

Although bullet is a common term, many people get it wrong. If you don’t believe that, linger around the ammunition department at Walmart for just a few minutes. See how many people walk up to the counter and ask to purchase bullets. When you purchase a box of ammo, you’re buying cartridges, which include the bullet, gun powder, and the shell that holds them all together. In reality, the bullet is simply the projectile in the cartridge, in most cases, the lead ball that propels towards your target.

Although there’s plenty more misused gun and ammo terms, these are some of the most common. What ones do you notice the most? Let us know!

Choosing the Best Handgun Ammo for Home Defense

One of the most commonly asked firearm related question is, ‘which is the best handgun ammo for home defense?’ There is no clear or right answer to that question. The truth is different calibers behave differently. Each caliber has unique set of advantages and disadvantages. Preference of a particular ammo also depends on the shooters experience. A new shooter may prefer a gun which is comfortable, accurate, and has less recoil while some shooters like the high caliber hand-cannon rounds. Now, a gun enthusiast can spend a lot of money buying different guns with different calibers in the pursuit of finding the right ammo.

However, for a family that can afford to buy only one handgun, this choice becomes much more crucial. To help you to take the right decision, here’s our list of the most popular types of ammo available in the market along with their advantages and shortcomings.

.22LR

This is one of the lightest and smallest rounds you can fire from a handgun. Thanks to its light weight it tends to tumble after hitting a target which can be lethal at close quarters. Being the smallest round it also has no recoil which in turn enables you to hit the target accurately and swiftly fire multiple rounds without straining your hands. However, this round has very little stopping power making it unfit for personal protection.

.32 ACP

The .32 ACP does have significantly more stopping power than the .22 and are often fired from super-compact concealable pistols. Several gun manufacturers have introduced series of compact pistols which are easily concealable and can be carried around without drawing any attention.

Therefore, if you want a very small pistol for concealed carrying, the .32 ACP rounded pistols might serve the purpose. Now, most people think that .32s are not good for home defense as it lack the power of a high caliber bullet. However, keep in mind that policemen used the .32 round extensively not that far back.

In fact, it continues to be popular among law enforcement officers in Europe.

.38 Special

Most gun experts and enthusiasts consider this round to be the minimum when it comes to serving as a personal protection weapon. The Special round manufactured specifically for revolvers and is undoubtedly one of the most popular rounds in the world. The round is good for most home defense situations and has decent stopping power. This is a well balanced round which delivers a perfect mix of stopping power and accuracy.

.357 Magnum

Consider the .357 Magnum round as the turbocharged .38. The rounds are more or less the same size but the .357 magnum has a lot more powder enabling it to reach higher velocities. However, more power comes at a price as .357 Magnum handguns are known have quite a kick. The significantly higher recoil may not be a trouble for experienced shooter but can be uncomfortable for new gun owners.

.380 ACP

This semi automatic pistol round was pretty popular in Europe before it came to America. John Browning designed and introduced it in 1912 in Belgium. Since then it’s considered to be a practical round for compact pistols. If you are looking to buy a pistol for the first time, the .380ACP is surely a strong contender.

9mm

Slightly more powerful than the .380s, the 9mm is easily the most inexpensive defensive rounds available in the US market. There are literally endless varieties of pistols that fire this round ranging from super compact pistols to full sized handguns giving you enough options if you are comfortable with the round. Overall the 9mm is hugely popular, has relatively less recoil, and adequately powerful for most defensive situations.

.40 S&W

Developed jointly by Smith & Wesson and Winchester, this round was aimed deliver a similar stopping power that of a 10mm rounds used briefly by FBI officers. However the .40 S&W does have shorter case which in turns means more tamed recoil. Law enforcement often uses this round in the US and has more than enough power to be part of any home.

.45 ACP

American soldiers have used his round every single war we’ve participated in in the past 70 years. Fired by historic M1911 pistol, this is a sturdy and reliable round that has proven itself in the battlegrounds of World War 2. .45ACP rounds are significantly heavier than the 9mm and deliver a more lethal punch. However, it also has higher recoil which means new users have to get used to it at first. The round is also cheaply available as most stores have a healthy stock of discount 45 auto ammo brands. Most experts believe that going anything above the .45 for defensive purposes is overkill and impractical.

The higher caliber rounds like the monstrous. 500 S&W significantly impacts the accuracy of a weapon and should only bought for recreational purposes.

Weapons and Ammunition to Hunt Hogs

Hog hunting grows in popularity. Yet it seems to make very little difference to the astounding expansion of the feral hog population. Gun manufacturers started designing hog specific rifles and hog specific ammunition. However, the wide geographic area in which hogs are hunted, doesn’t allow for one specific gun to do the job. Hogs in the California foothills require a different rifle as opposed to the hogs in Florida’s swamps. Hunters usually use the same rifle used in deer hunting, for example a Winchester Model 94. However, the modernization of hog hunting in specific made for suppressors, night vision scopes, and tactical edge added to the guns.

It would be close to impossible to list every adequate cartridge, ammo type and guns and rifles to kill hogs. Listed below are some of the typical weapons and cartridges, which are adequate in killing boar. Should you not find it here simply use it as reference and look for cartridges with similar ballistics. Choosing a caliber with too much recoil will make accurate shooting difficult especially for hunters with little experience. Any shotgun, handgun, or rifle, which have enough power to stop a 200-pound animal in its tracks, will kill hogs. You might reason that a hog is not as large as many other wild, but the difference lies in a wild boar’s toughness.

Best Weapons for Hog Hunting

~ The Winchester Model 94 has a smokeless .30-30 chambering and set the standard for lever action rifles and although a popular deer hunting rifle excellent for hog hunting. Its killing ability is 150 yards and less and suitable in jungle-like countryside.

~ The Winchester Model 70 with .30-06 cartridge is a favorite bolt-action hunting rifle for hogs. After this rifle’s introduction in the 1930s, the design alterations made during 1964 easily takes down hogs at ranges well beyond 200 yards. Hunters share the same opinion that lighter 150-grain bullets are effective, but recommend round nose 220-grain bullets to cut through thicker brush.

~ Marlin Model 1895 using a .444 bullet is the rifle hunters recommend when living in areas like northern Florida. Smaller projectiles easily deflect in the branches and twigs. The larger bullet pushes its way through branches and twigs with enough power to stop a large wild hog in its tracks.

~ Smith & Wesson Performance Center M&P15 Rifle with the .223/5.56mm cartridge is contrary to believe not too small for hog hunting. An excellent tactical rifle can take down large boars over 200 pounds successfully. With great balance, it features a two-stage, 4.5-pound trigger, A2 buttstock and 20-inch stainless barrel. It is extremely accurate even at distances of 300 yards.

~ Wilson Combat SBR Tactical in 6.8 SPC has a suppressor and 11.3-inch barrel with no recoil, making it ideal for beginner hunters, youngsters and women who are recoil sensitive. Hunters report that they have taken down hogs weighing over 300-pounds using Night Optics D740 NV scope while using Barnes 95gr TTSX.

~ Hog Hunter from manufacturer Savage that boasts a 20-inch-barrel bolt action with threaded barrel and rifle sights. It is available in .223, .308, and .338 Winchester with all three cartridges potent to kill large boar. Buy the 223 ammo online in bulk. You can also get any other ammo needed for your specific rifle, handgun, or shotgun online.

Best Ammunition for Hog Hunting

~ .280 Remington, which is a hand loader’s dream and great all-round hunting round effectively killing even huge wild hogs.

~ The .35 Remington has great terminal ballistics. Ensuring it is capable to take down large-bodied black bears thus recommended for hog hunting.

~ The Smith & Wesson .500 is a maxed-out cartridge killing anything that walks, crawls, or flies with capability of shooting five quick shots. The recoil of this heavyweight is more manageable when hunters use heavy long-barreled handguns for immediate killing shots.

~ .233 Remington is popular for shooting predators and varmint with mild recoil and suitable for various firearms with excellent accuracy. Accurate up to 300-yards this ammunition are also used in firearms, which are chambered for 5.56 mm cartridges.

A factor new hog hunters must take into consideration to stop a wild boar immediately is the perfect shot. They could take off running even after a good shot. It’s easy to lose track of it completely in dense bush. The perfect shot requires breaking the shoulder or spine. However, even then, it might continue running up to fifty yards further.

 

 

Selecting the “Right” Air Gun Was Never Easier

Whether you are a competitor who is fond of wining tournaments, a novice shooter launching yourself in the world of air guns, or a part time small game hunter—the act of getting your hands on the “right” air rifle is one of the most important factors for the overall enjoyment of this sport. Today, there are many companies that are manufacturing and dealing with air guns. Gamo, Crosman, and Ruger are some of the most reputed names in this field. Their products range from $80 to $400 and higher. If you are aware of what to look for, you’ll end up saving yourself a lot of effort and money.

Hunting, Plinking or Competing?

First, it is important for you to have a clear idea with regards to why you need a gun. If you are a total novice in this field and simply need a gun to shoot pigeons in your backyard or drop a few mangoes (just to get a feel of the sport), then the factors to focus upon include cost (ammos and guns), noise levels (you simply cannot offend the others around you) and scope (you can go in for a lower magnification unless you are the owner of a huge backyard). An air rifle in the range of $100-$150 will be good enough and allow you to enjoy your passion. If you are considering the caliber, then a .177 is less costly than a .22 and will meet your requirements effectively.

On the other hand, hunters are best advised to pick up guns that are accurate, powerful yet lightweight. Here, a .22 caliber air gun is seemingly more appropriate than the one with a.177 caliber. This is obviously dependent on the kind of game that you intend to shoot. A scope that has a higher magnification is especially helpful if you intend to shoot long distances or small animals. Here, easy portability is another important factor that demands attention.

Competitive shooters demand the highest levels of precision and accuracy and have to consider their trigger, recoil, barrel and sights. Heavier guns do not prove to be difficult for bench rest shooting and lead to better recoil management because of their weight. It’s a good idea to go in for a gun that promises a crisp and light trigger. A high quality scope that manages to hold zero is essential too.

Once you get your rifle home, you need to mount the scope, keep your target in view, backstop and break your gun in by shooting pellets downrange. Soon you will realize that your chosen air gun is the perfect fit for you. Reputed ammo dealers will help you get your hand on the “right” pellets, 10mm ammo and all other products that you may require in due course.

All the best.