Remington Arms

Remington's long history

Remington & Sons was founded in Ilion, New York 1816 by Eliphalet Remington II (1793–1861). Eliphalet Remington knew he had the skill to build a better gun than ones he could find on the market. Remington was 23 when he entered a shooting competition and took second place. Although he didn’t win, his flintlock rifle got a lot of attention. Remington was approached by many of the other shooters by the end of the day, asking to buy one of his guns. His company had become official with the help of his father, a blacksmith.

On March 7, 1888, the company was sold to Marcellus Hartley and Partners. The group included sporting goods chain Hartley and Graham of New York, New York. The company also owned Winchester Repeating Arms Company and the Union Metallic Cartridge Company. The company changed its name to the Remington Arms Company and moved to Bridgeport, Connecticut.

The Remington Arms Company

Remington is the oldest firearms manufacturer in the U.S. Remington is also the largest producer of rifles and shotguns in the U.S. They are the only company that makes firearms and ammunition. The original Ilion, New York plant is still standing and making high quality goods. The site also has a retail store and museum.

During WWI, Remington landed several military contract, including Enfield rifles for Britain M1907-15 Berthier rifles for France, and 1891 Mosin-Nagant rifles for Russia. Remington almost went bankrupt during the war when the Russian Imperial government ordered a large number of guns but had no way to pay for them. They insisted that the guns were faulty and refused to pay. Eventually, the U.S. stepped up and bought the guns, saving the company.

Remington Expands its Catalog

The 1920s saw a new period for Remington. They began making household utensils, cash registers and cutlery like hunting knives and pocketknives. They also began to sell clothing with the Remington logo, something that they discontinued in 1955.

DuPont bought Remington Arms in 1936, during the height of the Great Depression. It was also the year Remington went international, buying an ammunition manufacturer in Brazil.

In 1940, Remington built an ordinance plant in Independence, Missouri. They company opened five plants during WWII, one of which manufactured their legendary M1903 .30-06 Springfield bolt action rifle.

In the 1990s, Remington returned to making handguns.

Remington Ammo Today

Remington continued to build on its product line in the 21st Century. It began to make security and surveillance systems along with firearms and ammo. Remington created Spartan Gunworks, a subsidiary tasked with making an affordable high-quality shotgun.

In 2007, Cerberus Capital Management, a private equity company, bought Remington. The company’s name changed, ending with its current name – the Remington Outdoor Company.

The company had several good years until it saw a drop in sales and profitability. They filed for in March 2018.

 

.223 Remington From Combat to Popular Use

.223 Remington ammo

The .223 Remington cartridge came from a series of designs that were created after the Second World War. Germany had made famous their MP43 assault rifle. Military leaders demanded that their firearms designers follow suit. Designers were ordered to create ammunition that could mirror the success of the 7.92×33 Kurz cartridge. They required the ammo to be light enough to carry into combat and powerful enough to defeat its enemies. Munitions designers experimented with prototype assault rifles and scaled down cartridges. Members of the newly-formed NATO agreed to work together to create a universal rifle for the allied infantry.

Development of .223 Remington

The 1950s changed the firearms industry in many ways. The American military demanded lightweight rifles. In 1955, ArmaLite’s Chief Engineer, Eugene Stoner, presented his design for the ArmaLite AR-10. The AR-10 was the first lightweight infantry rifle, chambered to the 7.62x51mm NATO. The military rejected the AR-10 in favor of the M14, most likely because the former was too late to complete the appropriate tests.

The military revived the AR-10’s hopes in 1957. The United States Continental Army Command asked for a smaller version of the gun. They wanted the new rifle to use .22 caliber ammo. Stoner invented the AR-15 rifle.

In 1964, the U.S. Air Force adopted the AR-15 as the M-16 rifle. The rifle eventually became standard issue for the military.

In 1980, the .223 Remington round was changed again. It now uses a 62-grain full metal jacket bullet with a 7-grain steel core for improved penetration.

Current Specifications

The standard .223 cartridge uses a .224-inch diameter boat-tailed bullet in a rimless, bottle-necked case. The bullet measures 1.76 inches in length with the overall length of the round is 2.26 inches.

Standard factory loads range in weight from 35 to 85 grains. However, the most common is the 55-grain bullet. It uses a small rifle primer and has a max pressure of 55,000 PSI.

Popular Use

Remington introduced .223 ammo to the general public one month before it was adopted by the Air Force. It uses a lower pressure than the 5.56 NATO. As a result, it is good for target shooting, plinking and for first-timers or kids. Although it isn’t legal in all states, hunters often use the ammo to hunt deer or similar medium-size game. Perhaps the most common use is to control varmints – rats, rabbits, gophers, weasels and groundhogs, etc. The round can also stop larger pests such as skunks, coyotes, feral dogs and cats, raccoons, and opossums. The ammunition is relatively cheap, especially if it’s purchased in bulk. Secondly, it’s easy to get and can be used for a variety of things.

In addition to general use, .223 ammo is also a preferred round for law enforcement agencies. Police often use the ammo in their patrol cars, often as a replacement for a 12-gauge shotgun if they require more accuracy and precision.

With its wide range and popularity, the .223 Remington cartridge will continue to be one of America’s favorite rounds for years to come.

 

 

 

 

Top Picks for .308 Semi-Automatic Rifles

Hunters embrace semi-auto rifles

Winchester introduced its Winchester Model 70 bolt-action rifle in 1952. The rifle was accompanied by .308 ammunition. The cartridge was upgraded from the 7.62x51mm NATO, commonly used by the military.

The Ultimate Hunting Rifle

The Winchester .308 may be the most well-known rifle for hunting medium to large game. In fact, .308 ammo was made for hunting. The effectiveness of the gun and its ammo is the ability to deliver hydrostatic shock to its target, rendering the animal useless.

Hunters and competition shooters are loyal to their guns. Fans of the .308 swear by its ability to hit long-distance targets. Although the accuracy of a round deteriorates when shot father than 500 yards, the .308 is capable of making the trip.

Modern Uses

Hunting isn’t as popular as it used to be, but the .308 has found a modern audience. Law enforcement agencies and military units prize the .308 for accuracy and precision. It is useful in urban situations, able to hit a target at 1,000 yards. Unlike larger calibers, the Winchester .308 rifle is easy to shoot with less recoil than larger models.

There are several .308 semi-auto rifles on the market that offer advantages over the traditional rifle. In addition to being able to take down a prize elk or bear, the .308 semi-auto works well as a tactical training weapon. It will also do a good job of protecting the outside of your home from critters and intruders. It is not the best choice for in-home protection however, as the round is powerful and could easily cause personal injury or damage to the home. In that case, stick with your trusty shotgun or a pistol.

Top Picks

There are a lot of .308 semi-autos on the market but my pick for the top three is based on price and performance.

Century Arms C308

Serious enthusiasts love semi-automatics, even though they’re expensive. The exception is the Century Arms C308. For about $800 you can buy a rifle that is basically a copy of the HK G3. The gun uses a 5-round or 20-round detachable box magazine that won’t break the bank. Some say the C308 is slightly awkward to handle but that can be overcome with practice.

Ruger SR-762

The AR market has skyrocketed in recent years. The upside to the AR’s popularity is that parts and ammo are plentiful. The downside is that the guns aren’t cheap. You can expect to pay up to $2,000 for a Ruger SR-762.

Springfield M1A

The Springfield M1A is a civilian version of the rifle used by the military since the 1950s. Today’s M1A is more versatile as it comes in different sizes with a variety of options. The gun is known for being reliable and hearty, but it’s also heavy and long. The current price is just under $2,000.

Conclusion

Experienced gun owners know that it takes practice to adapt to any new weapon. My advice is to test out several models before choosing the one that suits you best. The only sure thing is that a .308 can last a lifetime.

 

 

The Iconic .22 LR

.22LR can be purchased in bulk

In 1857, Smith & Wesson introduced the .22 LR, which became the most popular rimfire cartridge in history. Enthusiasts use  it for target practice, training, plinking, sporting events, and varmint control. Shooters love the economical price and the fact that it is easy to buy in bulk. Shooters use the round in a variety of guns including handguns, shotguns, rifles, and submachine guns. Users appreciate the low recoil and small muzzle flash, which also makes it desirable for young and novice shooters.

.22LR ammo has four velocity ranges: subsonic, standard velocity, high velocity, and hyper velocity.

A Brief History

The .22 was designed for Smith & Wesson’s First Model. Designers modeled it after the 1845 Flobert BB cap. Weapons manufacturer J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. had combined a .22 Long casing with a 40-grain bullet used for the .22 Extra Long. Manufacturers have modified the bullet to accommodate additional grains of powder; currently, there are three types: .22 Short, .22 Long, and.22 Extra Long. The .22 Short is not often seen on the market although it can be purchased through online sources.

The .22 LR is interchangeable between guns which is a benefit for those using a variety of weapons. The round is not recommended for self-defense or large game hunting due to its lack of power.

Currently, the .22 LR is the only .22 rimfire cartridge seen on the market. The .22 Short is rare and in most circles has become scarce.

Self-Defense

Despite the fact that the .22 LR doesn’t have a great deal of stopping power, it is still a common choice for self-defense and concealed carry. The round can be chambered in small and lightweight pocket guns, easily carried in a purse or jacket.  Experts say that the cartridge will work well in most up-close situations, as long as the shooter has good aim. Shooters can fire the bullet fast and accurately so multiple shots are a possibility if they are needed. Since many people shoot to scare away their target, the .22 will work just fine.

Experts say that the brand of ammo is important when choosing a .22 LR. While many brands work well, you will find, on occasion, some that jam or misfire. Shooters should test different brands to find the one that works the best with their weapon of choice.

Popularity

Novice shooters use a .22 for target practice and training. The lack of power makes it safer for new users. The low recoil keeps the round from startling the shooter, thereby disrupting his posture and aim at the target. Countries restricting larger caliber bullets tend to permit the use of a .22 caliber.

It remains the bullet of choice for various organizations including the Boy Scouts of America and 4H Clubs. Military cadets use .22 LR cadet rifles for basic weapons and marksmanship training. The .22 LR is widely used in competition shooting, including the Olympic games, pistol and precision rifle competitions.

 

 

 

Powerhouse .50 AE

.50 AE Desert Eagle

The .50 Action Express was introduced in 1988. The cartridge was designed by Evan Whildin, former vice-president of Action Arms. Whildin designed the cartridge as part of a program to boost the performance of the semi-auto pistol by creating a new cartridge design. Whildin developed the Action Express line to travel faster and fire hotter than standard forms of ammo. When testing was complete, Whildin released the line to the public. It included the .50 AE, a 9 mm and .41 caliber rounds. Although the smaller calibers never gained popularity, the .50 Action Express caught the attention of the firearms community. The ammunition is still available from several major manufacturers including CCI, Speer, Hornady, and IMI (imported by Magnum Research).

The .50 AE was destined to be used in the IMI Desert Eagle, a semi-automatic pistol imported by Magnum Research, Inc. The gun was already chambered for the .44 Magnum, and would only need a barrel change to use the .50 cal. The .50 AE features the same rim diameter and overall length as the .44 Magnum.

Ballistics

The .50 Action Express ammo is one of the most powerful pistol cartridges on the market. It has a .500-inch bullet diameter enclosed in a 1.285-inch straight-walled case with a rebated rim. SAAMI says the maximum pressure of .50 AE should not exceed 36,000 PSI.

Users report a significant recoil and muzzle blast. Many compare the recoil to the .44 Magnum.

The .50 AE uses a 325- grain bullet and offers a muzzle velocity of 1400 FPS. The 300-grain bullet has a muzzle velocity of 1400 FPS and offers 1414 ft-lbs of energy.

Types of .50 AE Ammo

The .50 AE cartridge is available in several bullet types, including jacketed hollow point (JHP), Bonded Jacketed Hollow Point (BJHP), soft point (SP) and Jacketed Soft Point (JSP).

JHP ammunition uses a lead bullet encased in a hard metal, typically copper. The bullet contains a hollow point, which allows the bullet to expand upon impact. Users choose JHP ammunition for personal protection, home defense, and game hunting.

Soft Points do the job although they offer less stopping power. It gives shooters a slower expansion and deeper penetration. Manufacturers use a soft lead projectile. As a result, hunters will use soft point bullets  in areas where JHP cartridges are restricted.

Popularity

Whildin had a contract with the Israeli military. The Israeli Military Industries (IMI) Magnum Research Desert Eagle uses the ammunition, however, it was not the first gun to use the round. The first firearm chambered in the .50 AE caliber was the Arcadia Machine and Tool Automag V, a semi-auto, single action pistol. The weapons is described as the most “ergonomic and lightweight” of big caliber handguns.

Usage

Shooters choose the .50 AE when they want maximum power. Users prefer the round for silhouette shooting and medium to large game hunting, suitable against large predators such as bears. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (BATFE) categorizes the non-sporting round as a destructive device under its current regulations.

 

What Is A .22 Long Rifle?

The .22 Long Rifle is a rimfire cartridge that takes the top spot as the most common and popular cartridge in the world. While it’s not quite as readily available or inexpensive as it used to be, target shooters, small game hunters and competitive shooters have propelled it to become the standard cartridge for rifles. It is also the cartridge of choice for international sporting events such as the Olympic Games and other competitions including: Olympic precision Rifle and Pistol shooting, bullseye, biathlon, metallic silhouette, benchrest shooting, and pin shooting, as well as many youth events with the Boy Scouts of America, 4H, and Project Appleseed.

History of Rimfire Cartridges

Rimfire cartridges hold the distinct honor of being the oldest self-contained cartridge in existence. Originally made with copper casing, the bullet was the ideal for use in pistols and repeating rifles. Manufacturers chose copper casing due to the low cost and its malleability. This was less taxing on the weapon’s mechanisms, which often broke with larger caliber ammo.

The .22 LR first came on the scene in 1857 when Smith & Wesson developed it for their First Model, a spur-triggered revolver with a bottom-hinged barrel. The cartridge, loaded with 29-30 grain lead bullet with 4 grains of black powder, quickly caught the attention of shooters worldwide due to ease of use, portability, and economy. S&W had intended the .22 to be used for recreational use and competitive shooting but it soon became the choice of those wanting to carry small pistols for protection.

In 1871, the casing was extended to include an extra grain of black powder, renaming S&W’s offering .22 Short. In 1880, the cartridge morphed again when the Extra Long added yet another grain of powder, totaling 6 grains. The reduced accuracy caused shooters to shun the new cartridge which was eventually retooled in 1887 by the J. Stevens Arms & Tool Company. The .22 LR was born.

Since that time manufacturers have continued to make improvements on the cartridge, seeking to improve its accuracy and velocity. It remains relatively inexpensive to produce and you can use it in an infinite number of handguns and rifles.

The .22 LR Today

Today’s .22 LR loads are divided into four categories, based on velocity:

  • Subsonic, including “target” or “match” loads: below 1100 fps (feet per second)
  • Standard-velocity: 1120–1135 fps
  • High-velocity: 1200–1310 fps
  • Hyper-velocity/Ultra-velocity: over 1400 feet fps

Some argue that the .22 LR doesn’t wield as much power as the larger bore cartridges. While this is true, its diversity, accuracy, and low recoil continue to increase its popularity. Experts claim that the cartridge shouldn’t game hunters or those looking to protect themselves shouldn’t use it. However, it has proven that it can and will do the job if the placement is accurate. In some cases,  law enforcement and the military used it due to its low noise and ease of portability. The .22 LR is great for sporting events, target practice, training, and pest control.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get the Most from Your Suppressor with the Right Ammunition

When it comes to using a suppressor, more than just the suppressor impacts the volume of your gun fire. The ammunition you choose to fire also alters the sound and the decibels.

See, when you fire a bullet, three distinct sounds occur:

  1. Muzzle blast: When a bullet leaves your gun’s muzzle, high temperature and high pressure gases closely follow it, escaping. These gases cause both a bright flash and a loud blast.
  2. Sonic boom: Many bullets travel faster than the speed of sound (1,126 feet per second), causing a loud crack as the bullet forces its way through the air.
  3. Mechanical noise: All firearms make mechanical noises when your fire them. This includes the movement of the slide or blot action.

The Right Ammunition for Your Suppressor

When you use a suppressor, you quiet the muzzle blast.  A suppressor essentially captures gases that escape your gun’s muzzle, forcing them into baffles where they cool and dissipate before their release. This works great to lower the volume of the muzzle blast, and in many cases, can allow shooters to forego hearing protection.

But a suppressor does nothing for the shockwave sound created from a sonic boom. That means if you shoot a bullet with a velocity greater than 1,126 f/s, the loud crack that accompanies firing a gun still occurs. Sometimes called the sonic signature, this sound lasts as long as the bullet travels faster than sound.

To rid yourself of the sonic boom, you must increase the bullet’s weight to lower the velocity of your ammunition. Because of the added weight, these bullets slow down and the velocity falls below the sound barrier threshold. Called subsonic ammunition, these cartridges only make a slight change when shooting an unmodified firearm, but from a gun with a suppressor, subsonic ammo can make all the difference.

With a quality suppressor and the right ammunition, you only hear a few decibels of mechanical noise, which you can’t eliminate.

And while a suppressor can’t really silence a firearm the way the movies do suppressed sniper rifles, with subsonic ammunition, it may not make it silent, but it sure makes it quiet.

The Best Way to Store Ammunition

When boxes of ammo start to stack up in your closet, you want to make sure you’re storing it right. When exposed to certain elements, ammo can become damaged, and when you need it the most, it can fail. Yet when you store ammunition correctly, ammo can last a lifetime, if not longer.

Store your ammo properly with these simple tips.

Ammo Storage tip 1: Keep It Dry

To guarantee your ammo stays dry, consider keeping it in a new or used ammo can. Made from metal or plastic, a good ammo can has a rubber gasket that creates an airtight seal, keeping moist, humid air out and dry, cool air in. If you live somewhere with high levels of humidity (or even if you don’t), you should include a few moisture-absorbing packs in your ammo cans.

Ammo Storage Tip 2: Keep It Cool

When ammo gets too hot, it can impact the gunpowder’s chemical properties, so be sure to keep it away from extreme temperatures. Furnaces, wood burners, and even space heaters can cause temperature jumps, which are also important to avoid. While a 10-20 degree change over the course of year isn’t a big deal, 0-100 degrees can be, which means outdoor storage isn’t advisable in many areas of the country.

Ammo Storage Tip 3: Keep It Dark

Beyond cool and dry, keep your ammo in the dark, or at least away from the sun’s UV rays. Over time, the sun damages bullets in the same way it damages the metal on your vehicle. But if you store ammunition indoors in standard ammo cans (not clear plastic totes), it’s safe.

Ammo Storage Tip 4: Keep It Labeled

If you’re using multiple ammo cans, label the outside of each can with its contents. That way when you’re looking for ammo for a 9mm, you don’t keep opening ammo cans filled with .22 bulletsYou should also write the date on ammo boxes when you get them and rotate your stock. This guarantees you know what ammo is the oldest and use it first.

Safe Disposal of Bad and Unwanted Ammo

Regardless of the weapon or ammo manufacturer it is possible to have bad ammo at some point. For example, even trusted brands such as Wolf ammunition inevitably have bad ammo regardless of the reason. This may be because of bad primer used or corroded surplus rifle ammo. You might damage your ammo when loading or reloading your gun. The shipping process can also damage ammo. Now the question arise what to do with ammunition not fit for shooting?

Ways of Disposing Ammo

Shooting ranges often have a disposal bucket for dumping of stray dud rounds. However, the average person does not have a disposal receptacle at home. Though there is no specific and correct procedure, incorrect disposing of ammo poses dangers?

Depending on where you live it might even be illegal to dispose of ammo in your regular garbage. You should also keep in mind that most ammo contains lead. Even if the primer did not ignite when you pulled the guns trigger there is always the possibility that it can still go off during certain circumstances.

Safe Ammo Disposal

Safe ammo disposal therefore depends on several factors. Quantity is obviously the main deciding factor as one or two cartridges would be easy to ditch than dozens of cartridges which might have been left by someone in a garage of your new residence. The geographical location also plays a role in options open to you and living in major metropolitan areas would offer facilities equipped in handling ammo disposal. Ways of ammo disposal include the following:

Disassembling and re using as components might be salvageable with the use of a kinetic bullet pulling tool owned by many gun enthusiasts and very inexpensive. They often re-use both the bullet and the case even of the primer is worthless.

A common solution when you have more than just a few ammunition cartridges to dispose of is burying it. Burying it is a good solution and unlikely to hurt anyone as oppose to chucking it into the trash, although it might also be illegal depending on your location. Ammo has a higher lead concentration than what is already in the ground. It does have negative environmental impacts as you might realize when taking the purity of the lead into consideration.

You should always handle ammo properly. If you do not have a hazardous waste facility in your town, you can contact your local police force and they will take your unwanted ammo for you.

Air Rifle Ammo—the Best for Your Needs

One of the most common topics on air gun forums are the pros and cons of the different air rifle ammo. There are dozens of models that are making it to the top of the selection list of competitors, hunters, and amateur alike. There is also a lot of chatter on topics like pellets and ammunitions. You are likely to stumble upon discussions about the difference between .177 caliber pellets (for air guns) offered by different manufacturers.

To make things more complicated, you may find that a particular manufacturer’s ammo greatly outperforms that of another. Which one do you choose?

Weight of Pellets

In contrast to their heavier counterparts, lighter pellets are known to leave the air gun’s barrel faster and more accurately. This basically means that they take less time to reach their target and have a flatter trajectory. Heavier pellets usually boast of a less flat trajectory as they take a longer time to reach the target; this is because of the force of gravity that keeps pulling them towards the center of the Earth.

Resistance of Air

Air resistance is another essential factor that greatly influences the flight of air gun pellets; it increases along with the speed’s cube. Every time you double the actual speed of the pellet moving down the range, you end up increasing the air resistance. Air resistance plays a crucial role in hunting shots that are beyond a 10m range. This is one reason why shooters are advised to use the heaviest pellets possible.

Shape of Pellets

The other important factor that affects the usefulness of pellets is its shape. While Wad cutters are basically flat nose pellets that are used worldwide for shooting paper targets, the medium weight and round nosed pellets are recommended (for their shape and weight) for air rifles that are medium powered. For air rifles with small caliber (that measure .177 and.20), round nose hollow points serve to be the best hunting ammo. These pellets are reputed for gliding through the air and their regular round noses are capable of increasing the force of impact after the shot is fired.

Summing Up

Whether you are planning to use a 30-30 ammo or desirous of trying out air rifle ammo of varying shapes, weights and sizes (of different brands). You are well advised to indulge in proper research and go for the one that best suits your needs.

Are you ready to fire?